Best Practices for Sleep Apnea Treatment Plans

Sleep apnea has plagued millions of people over the years, but there is hope. Sleep physicians and dentists are coming together to work collaboratively to create new practices for sleep apnea treatment plans. Skill, licensure, and knowledge are all taken into account about each professional in order to provide the best outcome possible for their patients. Sleep physicians that are board-certified in sleep medicine are the best profession to be able to diagnose OSA properly. The next step is for a dentist who has been trained in sleep medicine to provide oral appliance therapy to the patient. After this process is done, your dentist will provide a follow up to make sure that the desired effects of the oral treatment took place. The AADSM has over 3,000 members, dentists that have proven they have the knowledge to excel with dental sleep medicine. The only way that these plans work is by upholding the highest of standards when it comes to their patients’ care. It is imperative to make sure that the physician and dentist you work with have AADSM Dental Sleep Medicine Facility Accreditation to guarantee the best results out of the...

An Overview of Sleep Apnea And Its Symptoms

Central and obstructive sleep apnea may have the same symptoms, which it is why it can be difficult to determine which type one has. The symptoms of obstructive and central sleep apnea may include the following: • Loud snoring • Waking up with a sore throat or dry mouth • Irritability • Morning headache • Waking up with shortness of breath • Episodes of breathing cessation • Excessive daytime sleepiness • Morning headaches When to see a Physician • Your snoring wakes you or your partner up • You experience shortness of breath • You stop breathing frequently at night • You experience daytime drowsiness Many people do not think that snoring is indicative of anything serious. However, it is important to see your doctor if you experience snoring or breathing cessation at night. You should also talk to your doctor if you have any sleeping problems. Daytime drowsiness may be indicative of sleep apnea or...

Oral Appliance Therapy

More patients with obstructive sleep apnea are being treated with oral appliance therapy. Studies have shown that the oral appliance therapy is highly-effective. It also has a high rate of success. Oral appliance therapy is ideal for patients with obstructive sleep disorder or snoring. It is also great for people who are looking for an alternative treatment. People who want to get oral appliance therapy should have at least 10 well-supported, healthy and well-distributed teeth. They must also have a tempo-mandibular joint system that is stable without restriction and pain during protrusive or lateral excursions. Dentists have to receive extra training in dental sleep medicine because this is not taught in residency programs or dental school. There are several oral appliances available. Patient physiology, anatomy, preferences and sleep behavior are things that determine the type of oral appliance that is recommended. Patients who use oral appliance therapy will need to follow-up regularly with their physicians and...

Predictor of Bad Health and Behavior

A study that was published in JAMA in 2013 showed that snoring is a health killer that is not so silent. The reason that people with sleep apnea snore so loudly is because they have a partially obstructed airway. Snoring can also have a negative effect on the heart. A study done by Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit showed that snoring can be one of the first indications of heart damage. Snoring can also have a number of negative effects on children. Children who snore may have behavioral issues in the future. Researchers have found that children who snore are more likely to develop hyperactivity disorder. They are also likely to develop anxiety, depression and other emotional problems. A report done by the Melbourne Monash Institute of Research stated that snoring affects behavior and learning in children by waking them...

A Dentist’s Role In Sleep Apnea

A good night’s sleep helps restore the mind and body. However, it is estimated that 18 million people in America do not get a good night’s rest due to the fact that they have sleep apnea. Obstructive sleep apnea is a serious condition that causes a person to stop breathing for 10 seconds or more at night. According to J. Micheal, DDS, FAGD, dentists are often the first ones to diagnose sleep apnea because patients typically see them more than their doctor. A dentist may refer the patient to a sleep medicine specialist. The patient may have to return to the dentist for further treatment. The treatment that is recommended is contingent upon the severity of the disorder. Losing weight, quitting smoking and altering the sleep position can help treat sleep apnea. A dental appliance can also be used to treat sleep apnea. Patients with severe sleep apnea may be required to use a continuous positive airway pressure, or CPAP machine. This device keeps the airway open by distributing continuous air pressure. It is important for you to have an open and honest conversation with your dentist if you suspect that you have sleep apnea. Morning headaches, insomnia, dry mouth and excessive snoring are some of the symptoms of sleep apnea. To receive a complimentary dental sleep apnea training consultation, please call us at (818)...

The Afib/OSA Profile

It is estimated that 2.7 to 6.7 million people have Afib. There are 25 million people living with obstructive sleep apnea, or OSA. One percent of the patients in my office have both conditions. The Afib/OSA Profile My typical patient is a middle-aged person. Both men and women can have Afib and OSA. Many patients complain that they have an irregular heartbeat, night sweats and cannot sleep. Some patients also show up exhibiting symptoms of sleep apnea, such as shortness of breath, extreme fatigue and lightheadedness. Additionally, it is common for women with sleep apnea to have a neck circumference of 16 inches and men to have a neck circumference of 17 inches. AFIB And The Heart AFIB is a type of arrhythmia that causes the top and bottom chambers of the heart to beat out of sync. People who have AFIB are four to five times more likely to have a stroke. It is estimated that 15 to 20 percent of ischemic strokes are caused by AFIB. What Do OSA And AFIB Have In Common? OSA often occurs during midlife and older age. It causes frequent interruptions in breathing. A person can stop breathing for 10 to 30 seconds. OSA can cause increased blood pressure and irregular heartbeat. These are the same symptoms that a person with Afib may experience. What Should I Do? Both OSA and AFIB are very treatable. You should see your primary care doctor if you notice palpitations and an irregular heartbeat. Make sure you tell your doctor if you snore or have morning headaches. Your primary care doctor may refer you to a...
 
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