Adenoids and Tonsils in Children

Adenoids and Tonsils in Children

Adenoids and tonsils are located right behind the nose. Together, they form part of the lymphatic system which is responsible for clearing away infections and maintaining body fluid balance. Dr. Nicole Greenman of DSM Solutions advises that if you notice inflamed tonsils coupled with swollen glands in young patients, they may be red flags that the child has an obstructive sleep disorder. Swollen or Enlarged Tonsils and Adenoids Enlarged tonsil and adenoids should be taken seriously, because they increase risks of breathing-related sleep disorders. Watch Out For the Symptoms Due to swollen adenoids, a child’s air pathways may be obstructed causing them to breathe through their mouth at night. Untreated breathing-related sleep disorders such as sleep apnea and snoring have the potential of negatively impacting a child’s health and development Other diseases and disorders such as Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, poor growth and development, and risks of developing cardiovascular disease have been attributed to childhood sleep disorders, as documented in reputable medical journals. Prompt diagnosis by a well-trained sleep apnea dentist after recognizing red flags such as inflamed tonsils, swollen glands, and teeth grinding is vital for reversing and preventing long-term damage associated with airways obstruction in...
Neural Circuits in Mice Point to Sleep Apnea Relief

Neural Circuits in Mice Point to Sleep Apnea Relief

We at DSM Solutions are here to stay up to date on the latest medical findings related to sleep apnea so that you can be an informed an effective dentist at treating it and related disorders. New findings by medical researchers that have been able to pinpoint a particular style of neural circuitry that arouses mice brains simulating sleep apnea conditions. These findings could result in new methods and medicines that assist patients with obstructive sleep apnea in increasing the amount of sleep they can get at night. Because of the breathing cycle that takes place and the changes in the oxygen and carbon dioxide levels in the blood, the brain provides an alert to the person sleeping right in time to re-establish their breathing. This cycle repeats itself multiple times during the night, so the person with sleep apnea is prevented from getting the necessary deep sleep that they need. They often have no memory this by the morning time. Saper, a Professor of Neurology and Neuroscience at Harvard Medical School stated that “If we could keep the brain from waking up during sleep apneas episodes and only activate that one part of the brain that open up the airways, those with sleep apnea would be able to get a good night’s sleep.” After additional experiments were made, Saper and colleagues concluded that there needs to be a drug that has the ability to reduce the wake-up responses while altering the opening of the airways during the process. The intent is to prevent people with sleep apnea from waking up during the night so that they will be...

Snoring: A Troublesome Problem

Although as many as half of all adults snore at least sometimes, snoring is not a normal habit. Sleep should be quiet with effortless breathing. Causes Snoring is frequently caused when a person’s airway is blocked. Tissues in the throat make the sound as air passes over them. This can lessen air flow and decrease oxygen. Dangers Often associated with snoring, sleep apnea is a health hazard that occurs when one a person breathing for a minimum of ten seconds at regular intervals while sleeping. Because sleep apnea causes a lack of oxygen and raised levels of carbon dioxide, it can lead to daytime drowsiness. Solutions For those who snore or have sleep apnea, there are solutions available to help them experience refreshing, beneficial sleep. Personalized treatment plans can help stop snoring or prevent sleep apnea, but before beginning, a person should first be evaluated for potential sleep...

Dental Sleep Medicine (DSM) Conference: Research Trends Emerge

The American Academy of Dental Sleep Medicine (AADSM) hosted the Academy’s 26th Annual Meeting on June 2nd through June 4th, 2017 in Boston, Massachusetts. The gathering, attended by more 1,200 professionals including both sleep medicine professionals and dentists, honored the winners of the 2017 AADSM Research Award. Guest speakers gave a number of interesting presentations on advances in oral appliances.   Research Trend 1: Predicting Oral Appliance Therapy Outcomes The University of Sydney’s Dr. Kate Sutherland, Ph.D. presented her abstract as the Academy’s keynote speaker. Dr. Sutherland’s research focuses on obstructive sleep apnea, or OSA. Her goal is to help the sleep medicine community recognize the heterogeneity of the condition with an eye toward better recognizing and treating OSA in patients.   In her research, Dr. Sutherland has looked at the expressions of OSA, in particular obesity and certain features of the skull, that are risk factors for OSA. She uses imaging tools as well as clinically applicable surrogates. Her goal is to be able to identify those clinical features which will predict the individual patient’s outcome in using therapies other than continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP), in particular oral appliances.   Other researchers have looked into sleep medicine’s ability to predict patient outcomes with oral appliance therapy. These researches include Maysaa Khojah, BDS, MS, who won an AADSM Clinical Research Award. Dr. Khojah’s results showed significant correlation between the patient’s facial anatomy and the patient’s outcome with regard to oral appliances.   Additional abstracts presented at the meeting looked at the correlations between oral appliance therapy outcomes and physical features that included the following:   Aerodynamics of the...

Best Practices for Sleep Apnea Treatment Plans

Sleep apnea has plagued millions of people over the years, but there is hope. Sleep physicians and dentists are coming together to work collaboratively to create new practices for sleep apnea treatment plans. Skill, licensure, and knowledge are all taken into account about each professional in order to provide the best outcome possible for their patients. Sleep physicians that are board-certified in sleep medicine are the best profession to be able to diagnose OSA properly. The next step is for a dentist who has been trained in sleep medicine to provide oral appliance therapy to the patient. After this process is done, your dentist will provide a follow up to make sure that the desired effects of the oral treatment took place. The AADSM has over 3,000 members, dentists that have proven they have the knowledge to excel with dental sleep medicine. The only way that these plans work is by upholding the highest of standards when it comes to their patients’ care. It is imperative to make sure that the physician and dentist you work with have AADSM Dental Sleep Medicine Facility Accreditation to guarantee the best results out of the...
 
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